Brethren Archive

Grave of Anne Darby

St. Mary Churchyard, Warbleton, East Sussex






Description:

Widow of John Darby, Mother of John Nelson Darby.

This is same grave as George Darby & Children.

Anne Vaughan was the daughter of Samuel Vaughan.

Died 1847, Age 90.

This creates an interesting problem to resolve when compared with the passage in WG Turner's biography;

"His mother's death when he was only five years old, made a deep and lasting impression upon young Darby. And the tender memory which he cherished in his heart of her would sometimes find expression on unexpected occasions. When he was fifty years of age we find him writing of her thus: "I have long, I suppose, looked at the portrait of my mother, who watched over my tender years with that care which only a mother knows how to bestow. I can just form some imperfect thought of her looks, for I was early bereft of her; but her eye fixed upon me that tender love which had me for its heart's object — which could win when I could know little else — which had my confidence before I knew what confidence was — by which I learnt to love, because I felt I was loved, was the object of that love which had its joy in serving me — which I took for granted must be; for I had never known aught else. All that which I had learnt, but which was treasured in my heart and formed part of my nature, was linked with the features which hung before my gaze. That was my mother's picture. It recalled her, no longer sensibly present, to my heart.""

 





Comments:
Researcher II said ...
A later version of Turner's book ('Unknown and Well Known', a biography of John Nelson Darby, compiled from reliable sources chiefly by W G Tuner, edited by E N Cross, published by Chapter Two), rewords the paragraph:

It was in boyhood that a domestic crisis seems to have arisen in the Darby household and John was removed from the tender upbringing of his mother; and the impression made upon him was very deep; so much so that, in spite of a stormy ecclesiastical career, the tender memory which he cherished in his heart of her sometimes found expression on unexpected occasions. When fifty years of age, he writes of her as follows: `I have long, I suppose, looked at the portrait of my mother, who watched over my tender years with that care which only a mother knows how to bestow. I can just form some imperfect thought of her looks, for I was early bereft of her; but her eye fixed upon me that tender love which had me for its heart's object — which could win when I could know little else — which had my confidence before I knew what confidence was — by which I learnt to love, because I felt I was loved, was the object of that love which had its joy in serving me — which I took for granted must be; for I had never known aught else. All that which I had learnt, but which was treasured in my heart and formed part of my nature, was linked with the features which hung before my gaze. That was my mother's picture. It recalled her, no longer sensibly present, to my heart.'
Tuesday, Oct 13, 2015 : 07:41


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